Immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels. Immersion: The Science and Mystery of Freshwater Mussels: Landis, Abbie Gascho: Hardcover: 9781610918077: Powell's Books 2019-01-24

Immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels Rating: 5,4/10 503 reviews

Immersion: The Science and Mystery of Freshwater Mussels

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

Accompanied often by her husband, a mussel scientist, and her young children, she learned to see mussels on the creekbed, to tell a spectaclecase from a pigtoe, and to worry what vanishing mussels—70 percent of North American species are imperiled—will mean for humans and wildlife alike. Studying mussels is excellent practice in understanding complex, overlapping relationships. The E-mail message field is required. This is truly a well-written, account of a little creature that most of us don't think much about. Sat at the bottom of a river bed half buried and only a couple of apertures on show, you can't blame her for her frustration at not being able to see something, even when somebody is pointing straight at it! Landis gracefully chronicles these untold stories with a veterinarian's careful eye and the curiosity of a naturalist. Immersion is a tale about mussels, motherhood, curiosity, climate change, water. In turns joyful and sobering, Immersion is an invitation to see rivers from a mussel's perspective, a celebration of the wild lives visible to those who learn to search.

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Immersion: The Science and Mystery of Freshwater Mussels / AvaxHome

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

The descriptions of the research being carried out are particularly fascinating, especially those involving the bivalve life cycle. In the tradition of writers like Terry Tempest Williams and Sy Montgomery, Landis gracefully chronicles these untold stories with a veterinarian's careful eye and the curiosity of a naturalist. This means that the right kind of fish, sometimes a specific species, must be nearby in order for the mussel to reproduce. Part scientist, part observer, and part campaigner against water pollution, she puts herself and her family at the centre of the story. I get a little teary when I imagine such attention to so many small, valued lives. To improve their odds of success, female freshwater mussels have evolved lures that resemble either a small fish or worm to attract the right type of host. The biggest surprise is that it is not about mussels; they merely play a leading role.

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Immersion: The Science and Mystery of Freshwater Mussels by Abbie Gascho Landis

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

For the animal shall not be measured by man. Small facts about mussels surprised me. Immersion: The Science And Mystery Of Freshwater Mussels Abbie Gascho Landis Island Press, £18. Freshwater mussels—more diverse in the Southeast than anywhere else in the world—die in drying creeks, invoking the Endangered Species Act to protect their habitat. Within Walking Distance by Philip Langdon by While walking around and enjoying the summer sunshine, don't forget to pack by.

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Immersion: The Science and Mystery of Freshwater Mussels by Abbie Gascho Landis

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

One large river basin, draining the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint Rivers, sits at the junctions of Alabama, Georgia, and Florida, and at the heart of decades-long legal battles known as the Tri-State Water Wars. Toward the middle, she provided top notch biology chapters. Mussels have much to teach us about the health of our watersheds if we step into the creek and take a closer look at their lives. This is neither cloying nor vain, and her growing fascination with her subject is infectious. Submerging my face in a creek for the first time stands out as a revelatory moment for me. After an hour of fruitless scanning, a mussel materialized from the rocks--a little spectaclecase, herself pregnant, filtering the river water through a delicate body while her gills bulged with offspring. Freshwater mussels are important because their filter feeding can purify the water, benefiting other organisms in the environment.

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Immersion: The Science And Mystery Of Freshwater Mussels Download

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

In the tradition of writers like Terry Tempest Williams and Sy Montgomery, Landis gracefully chronicles these untold stories with a veterinarian's careful eye and the curiosity of a naturalist. When we learn to value a thriving, diverse mussel community as the sign of a healthy river, we are practicing a more gentle way of treating the environment, animals, and, perhaps, each other Nearly seventy percent of freshwater mussel species are imperiled, but Immersion is not despondent. On a more encouraging note: In September 2016, the Seed Exchange Democracy Act Assembly Bill 1810 was signed into law in California. Fortunately for these mussels, they do not taste good to people, but in years past, they were collected for pearls and harvested by the button industry and shell collectors. Mussels breathe, eat, and defecate with the same organs—their gills. The focus is on current or recently completed work from a long-term project. Each mussel shell glows inside with a pearly lining—pink, white, or purple.

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Immersion: The Science and Mystery of Freshwater Mussels (Hardcover)

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

I do have a few issues with the book, the flow can be disrupted now and then by another question being asked before the last question had been done with, there seem to be lots of tangents and a couple of the chapters abruptly end. While it's sad that the mussel needs to be listed, the act of listing it means that its habitat which is significant! Given their exquisite sensitivity and our decimation of their homes, I am happily amazed that freshwater mussels continue to exist at all. For example, many mussel species will actively burrow down or crawl towards water to try to survive drought. Threats loom in the form of both physical activity, such as dredging and damming, and chemical pollution from pesticides, fertilisers and pharmaceuticals. It is still worth reading though. I've enjoyed reading this and learning loads at the same time.

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Immersion

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

How about a whole pot? After an hour of fruitless scanning, a mussel materialized from the rocks--a little spectaclecase, herself pregnant, filtering the river water through a delicate body while her gills bulged with offspring. After an hour of fruitless scanning, a mussel materialized from the rocks—a little spectaclecase, herself pregnant, filtering the river water through a delicate body while her gills bulged with offspring. Part scientist, part observer, and part campaigner against water pollution, she puts herself and her family at the centre of the story. At river bottom, mussels can give us a unique angle on how the landscape and water flowing through it connect us. Landis gets under the skin of not so much a single animal, but a whole ecosystem. Accompanied often by her husband, a mussel scientist, and her young children, she learned to see mussels on the creekbed, to tell a spectaclecase from a pigtoe, and to worry what vanishing mussels—70 percent of North American species are imperiled—will mean for humans and wildlife alike. Accompanied often by her husband, a mussel scientist, and her young children, she learned to see mussels on the creekbed, to tell a spectaclecase from a pigtoe, and to worry what vanishing mussels — 70 percent of North American species are imperilled — will mean for humans and wildlife alike.

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Immersion

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

My knowledge of mussels is that you can eat them. The mussels depend on fish for completion of their cycle, with each species exhibiting different behaviours when subjected to drought conditions. In Immersion, Landis shares this journey, travelling from perilous river surveys to dry streambeds and into laboratories where endangered mussels are raised one precious life at a time. Freshwater mussels can live for 100 years, recording their age by adding rings to their shells, similar to the rings of a tree trunk. Why is it important to pay attention to this region? In the past mussels fed Native Americans, but people no longer harvest them, perhaps due to a chemical called putrescine a characteristic of decaying animal tissue that may affect their flavor. Mussels have much to teach us about the health of our watersheds if we step into the creek and take a closer look at their lives.

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A veterinarian pens a lyrical love letter to the imperiled freshwater mussel

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

An unusual as well as endearing weaving of memoir and nature writing. The labels, which need to be in English, must clearly state the name of the species or commonly accepted name of kind of plant. Unfortunately, problems with both water quality and water quantity have reduced their populations to such a degree that many mussel species are endangered. Female mussel gills have marsupial compartments that brood larval babies. One of her 21 books was a finalist. Posters of mussels hung in our bedroom. In turns joyful and sobering, Immersion is an invitation to see rivers from a mussel's perspective, a celebration of the wild lives visible to those who learn to search.

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Immersion: The Science And Mystery Of Freshwater Mussels Download

immersion the science and mystery of freshwater mussels

Grounded in science and ranging across the historical, the political, and the personal, the story is as rooted and responsive as the animals Landis writes about. In Immersion: The Science and Mystery of Freshwater Mussels, Landis brings readers to a hotbed of mussel diversity, the American Southeast, to seek mussels where they eat, procreate, and, too often, perish. Those gills help mussels filter water, removing particles to make it cleaner. . Landis shares this journey, traveling from perilous river surveys to dry streambeds and into laboratories where endangered mussels are raised one precious life at a time. Part scientist, part observer and part campaigner against water pollution, she puts herself and her family at the centre of the story.

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