Sacrificing families abrego leisy j. 9780804788311: Sacrificing Families: Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders 2019-03-21

Sacrificing families abrego leisy j Rating: 6,8/10 101 reviews

Leisy J. Abrego (2014), Sacrificing Families. Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

But the reality of their experiences is often harsh, and structural barriers-particularly those rooted in immigration policies and gender inequities-prevent many from reaching their economic goals. But the reality of their experiences is often harsh, and structural barriers—particularly those rooted in immigration policies and gender inequities—prevent many from reaching their economic goals. The book challenges readers to consider immigration from a new perspective. Their dreams are straightforward: with more money, they can improve their children's lives. Finally, Abrego asks why these families need to make so many sacrifices and why they have to experience separation across national borders. For some families, this difficult separation is at the same time their sole survival strategy. The voices of these immigrant families vividly combine with Abrego's sophisticated analysis to make us rethink what it means to live in transnational spaces today.

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UCLA Department of Chicana/o Studies

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

The inequalities parents face have implications for both individual children and the next generation. What prevents these parents from migrating with their children? In a debate dominated by rhetoric and statistics, the voices of these children raise extremely important issues. Widening global inequalities make it difficult for parents in developing nations to provide for their children, and both mothers and fathers often find that migration in search of higher wages is their only hope. Sacrificing Families is a must read on why families choose to become transnational, how they struggle to overcome distance and time, and the United States immigration policies that force this cultural and emotional divide. Widening global inequalities make it difficult for parents in developing nations to provide for their children, and both mothers and fathers often find that migration in search of higher wages is their only hope. As free trade agreements expand and nation-states open doors widely for products and profits while closing them tightly for refugees and migrants, these transnational families are not only becoming more common, but they are living through lengthier separations. Sacrificing Families is a must read on why families choose to become transnational, how they struggle to overcome distance and time, and the United States immigration policies that force this cultural and emotional divide.

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Sacrificing Families: Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders by Leisy Abrego

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

What are these families' experiences with long-term separation? Her second book, Immigrant Families Polity Press, 2016 , is co-authored with Cecilia Menjívar and Leah Schmalzbauer and delves deeply into the structural conditions contextualizing the diverse experiences of contemporary immigrant families in the United States. Leisy Abrego gives voice to these immigrants and their families and documents the inequalities across their experiences. But the reality of their experiences is often harsh, and structural barriers—particularly those rooted in immigration policies and gender inequities—prevent many from reaching their economic goals. And why do some ultimately fare better than others? Menjívar, Cecilia and Leisy Abrego. Key players include the governments of El Salvador, Mexico, and—especially through the categorization of immigrants—the United States. Leisy Abrego gives voice to these immigrants and their families and documents the inequalities across their experiences.

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Leisy J. Abrego (2014), Sacrificing Families. Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

Leisy Abrego gives voice to these immigrants and their families and documents the inequalities across their experiences. What prevents these parents from migrating with their children? And why do some ultimately fare better than others? Using in-depth interviews of parents in the U. And why do some ultimately fare better than others? Her scholarship analyzing legal consciousness, illegality, and legal violence has garnered numerous national awards. It captures the tragedy of these families' daily living arrangements, but also delves deeper to expose the structural context that creates and sustains patterns of inequality in their well-being. She also dedicates much of her time to supporting and advocating for refugees and immigrants by writing editorials and pro-bono expert declarations in asylum cases. The second part of the volume is devoted to findings from interviews with children left in El Salvador. And while the experiences of migrants play a role, her focus is more on the children left behind when parents leave to work in the United States.

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Sacrificing Families by Leisy J. Abrego (ebook)

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

What are these families' experiences with long-term separation? And why do some ultimately fare better than others? What prevents these parents from migrating with their children? Leisy Abrego gives voice to these immigrants and their families and documents the inequalities across their experiences. A must read for anyone interested in families and immigration policy. In a debate dominated by rhetoric and statistics, the voices of these children raise extremely important issues. Instead of the public debate in the United States, it's the debate in El Salvador that frames Leisy Abrego's argument. Abrego, Leisy and Cecilia Menjívar. Although this population may be disaggregated along several axes, one central distinction among them is their age at migration.

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Sacrificing Families : Leisy J. Abrego : 9780804790512

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

Leisy Abrego gives voice to these immigrants and their families and documents the inequalities across their experiences. And why do some ultimately fare better than others? Abrego eloquently weaves the narratives of transnational families together, while connecting them to the broader political and social context that continues to shape immigration policies. She outlines the policy implications of this research and emphasizes the need for comprehensive U. Menjívar, Cecilia and Leisy Abrego. In a debate dominated by rhetoric and statistics, the voices of these children raise extremely important issues. The production of illegality has a cumulative effect—on border crossings, housing, work opportunities, and above all, movement between nations.

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9780804788311: Sacrificing Families: Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

She attempts to identify the role played by long-time separation between parents and their children in the various kinds of consequences found across transnational families. A must read for anyone interested in families and immigration policy. Her award-winning first book, Sacrificing Families: Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders Stanford University Press, 2014 , examines the well-being of Salvadoran immigrants and their families—both in the United States and in El Salvador—as these are shaped by immigration policies and gendered expectations. Menjívar, Cecilia and Leisy Abrego. What prevents these parents from migrating with their children? It captures the tragedy of these families' daily living arrangements, but also delves deeper to expose the structural context that creates and sustains patterns of inequality in their well-being. Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders will be of particular interest toresearchers interested in compelling portrayals of transnational families and the issues they face in the twenty-first century. But the reality of their experiences is often harsh, and structural barriers—particularly those rooted in immigration policies and gender inequities—prevent many from reaching their economic goals.

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Leisy J. Abrego (2014), Sacrificing Families. Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

Abrego presents a detailed, careful analysis of the micro-social realities of family separation across nations. The book is an important step in what is developing into a very promising scholarly career. And why do some ultimately fare better than others? And why do some ultimately fare better than others? The book consists of eight chapters. She is a member of the first large wave of Salvadoran immigrants who arrived in Los Angeles in the early 1980s. Abrego shows that the situation of Salvadoran immigrants and their families does not always change after migration. As free trade agreements expand and nation-states open doors widely for products and profits while closing them tightly for refugees and migrants, these transnational families are not only becoming more common, but they are living through lengthier separations. What are these families' experiences with long-term separation? Their dreams are straightforward: with more money, they can improve their children's lives.

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Sacrificing Families: Navigating Laws, Labor, and Love Across Borders by Leisy Abrego

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

Contact Information Email Office Bunche 7357 Phone 310 206-9414 Leisy J. Unfortunately the programme was suspended. States are responsible for much of the suffering families experience before, during, and after migration. As free trade agreements expand and nation-states open doors widely for products and profits while closing them tightly for refugees and migrants, these transnational families are not only becoming more common, but they are living through lengthier separations. What are these families' experiences with long-term separation? Abrego presents a detailed, careful analysis of the micro-social realities of family separation across nations.

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Sacrificing Families by Leisy J. Abrego (ebook)

sacrificing families abrego leisy j

Based on ethnographic observations and in-depth interviews of Latino undocumented immigrants from 2001 to 2010, I examine how illegality is experienced differently by social position. Their dreams are straightforward: with more money, they can improve their children's lives. The law has either hindered or facilitated labour mobility at different points in time. Sacrificing Families offers a first-hand look at Salvadoran transnational families, how the parents fare in the United States, and the experiences of the children back home. Debates about immigration in the United States—whether in public discourse or among policymakers—tend toward the facile. Their dreams are straightforward: with more money, they can improve their children's lives.

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